Ofer Pelz

 

 


 

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ABOUT - PRESS REVIEWS

"Mr. Pelz’s fluttering “Chinese Whispers” brought the five excellent Meitar players, including the clarinetist Jonathan Hadas and the violinist Moshe Aharonov, together. The end — long seconds of toneless evocation of breathing — was as delicate as music gets."

Zachary Woolfe, The New-York Times review of the MATA Festival concert 18.4.2013



"Deux œuvres d’, un jeune et talentueux compositeur israélien formé à Jérusalem, à Paris, et à Montréal, complétaient le programme. Convergence et Chinese Whispers s’inscrivent dans le sillage de Philippe Leroux (ce dernier enseigne la composition à Montréal depuis 2009) en ce que la musique s’y construit au moyen de gestes sonores obtenus à partir d’instruments traditionnels.

Dans Convergence (2010), la flûte alto dialogue avec son écho modifié en direct par un dispositif électronique ; elle nous révèle également qu’un instrument de musique est capable de produire une foule de sons au-delà des notes de la gamme auxquelles on la cantonne habituellement. Mais au-delà de toute considération technique, Convergence  nous plonge dans un univers envoûtant qui évoque une forêt luxuriante peuplée d’animaux mystérieux.

Chinese Whispers (2013) peut être considéré comme un prolongement de Convergence. Commande de l’ensemble Meitar, la pièce s’ouvre avec un passage percussif auquel se mélangent le souffle des instruments à vent et les soupirs des cordes. Après un long glissando collectif (où l’on retrouve, comme chez Philippe Leroux, une inspiration « électronique » appliquée à la musique acoustique), la pièce finit par exhaler son dernier souffle à travers les instruments à vents. C’est dans ce genre de moments que résident l’originalité d’Ofer Pelz : ce qui n’est habituellement qu’un effet sonore devient chez lui matière à musique."

Martin Guerpin, ResMusica, about the Meitar concert at La chapelle Historique, Montreal 30.4.2013



"...Phrases were punctuated by silences, these pauses taking on more meaning as they accumulated, plunging the listener into a heightened state of concentration and bringing him into close contact with his own senses. The beauty of small gestures articulated cleanly and with delicacy is paramount in this work. One of Israel’s most prominent young composers..."

Pamela Hickman's concert critique blog



"The composer Ofer Pelz in his piece "Do Bats eat Cats?" (2010-2011). The motivations which brought this nonsense question from "Alice in wonderland", supposedly inspired Pelz to think differently, to express with music, worlds that are not behaving by the known rules, to exhibit the ensemble in a mirror-land where time is tuned differently and the reflecting colors shine unfamiliarly.
Pelz did not go against the nature of the instruments, although he uses blowing sounds without pitches, and ricochet effect with the strings: he just present them in a kaleidoscope where chopped rhythm, pauses, glimpse of notes, and a mixture of plucking-hitting-blowing effects create a pleasant world to listen to."

Noam Ben-Zeev, Haaretz - review of the new CD released by The Israel Contemporary Players (Hebrew)


"… the piece stood out in its originality and through its insightful use of musical expression.The piece exhibited a successful combination of new ideas with a clear mastering of compositional skills…"

Habama, Acum prize coverage. (Hebrew)


"Although the duo achieve a very specific sound aesthetic from the beginning of the record, they somehow find varying ways to re-interpret themselves making for a very encapsulating experience from beginning to end."

Donovan Burtan, Positivelyunderground, about Whim



"...Written for a group of instruments and electronics, wonderfully conducted by Karin Ben-Josef, the piece (Unisoni Trasparenti) exposed an original and unique language that much depth and thought were put into ... It was a pleasure to listen to the complex music, where the electronic and acoustic worlds merge, well executed; it was worthwhile going to this concert, if only for this end…"

Noam Ben Zeev, City Mouse 07.06.2010 - review of a concert played by Meitar ensemble -
Hateiva, Tel-Aviv (Hebrew)



"... The piece (Equilibrium) is polyrhythmically challenging, explored by new means of musical sound... The composer succeeds to create dramatic music with the use of minimal means, which all together are combined to create a unique world of sounds that the ear does not get tired of listening to."

Dafna Yudovitch, Globes, 11.03.2009. Coverage ACUM prizes. (Hebrew)


"...It was a pleasure to listen to the sound world that emerged during the piece (Do Bats eat Cats?)...with a delicate taste, humor, and a clear formal perception that is logical and unique."

Noam Ben-Zeev, Haaretz - review of a concert played by the Israeli contemporary players - Hateiva, Tel-Aviv. (Hebrew)

"Ofer Pelz's piece "Do Bats eat Cats?", with a title borrowed from L. Carroll, was one of the most daring pieces in this concert, mainly for its use of silences. At the start of the piece, there were soft noises and percussive sounds with long silences between them... One could find in it something risky and rude, which gave the piece a drive as it became more and more dense. The result was a magical and sharp collage..."

Tel-Aviv City, review of a concert played by the Israeli contemporary players - Hateiva, Tel-Aviv. (Hebrew)

 

 

 

 
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